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Unclear When Water Will Be Safe Again

Federal officials now involved in probe of accident

January 11, 2014
By BRENDAN FARRINGTON, Associated Press Writer , The Intelligencer / Wheeling News-Register

CHARLESTON - A chemical spill left the water for 300,000 people in and around West Virginia's capital city stained blue-green and smelling like licorice, with officials saying Friday it was unclear when it might be safe again to even take showers and do laundry.

Federal authorities began investigating how the foaming agent escaped a chemical plant and seeped into the Elk River. Just how much of the chemical leaked into the river was not yet known.

Officials are working with the company that makes the chemical to determine how much can be in the water without it posing harm to residents, said West Virginia American Water president Jeff McIntyre.

Article Photos

AP Photo
City officials help direct traffic through a water distribution site set up Friday at a recreation center in South Charleston, W.Va.

"We don't know that the water's not safe. But I can't say that it is safe," McIntyre said Friday. For now, there is no way to treat the tainted water aside from flushing the system until it's in low enough concentrations to be safe, a process that could take days.

Officials and experts said the chemical, even in its most concentrated form, isn't deadly. However, people across nine counties were they shouldn't even wash their clothes in water affected, as the compound can cause symptoms ranging from skin irritation and rashes to vomiting and diarrhea.

No more than six people have been brought into emergency rooms with symptoms that may stem from the chemical, and none were in serious or critical condition, said State Department of Health & Human Resources Secretary Karen L. Bowling.

Fact Box

Local Collections Being Held

Collection drives have been set this weekend to assist residents in the nine affected counties.

- Bottled drinking water and other items will be collected from 12:30-2 p.m. Sunday at Christ United Methodist Church, 1232 National Road, Wheeling; and from 7-9 a.m. Monday at

Wheeling Country Day School, 8 Park Road.

Delegate Erikka Storch, R-Ohio, has organized the effort and will drive the items to Charleston on Monday when she leaves to attend the

legislative session. Items needed include

disposable tableware products, sanitary wipes, handwipes, dry shampoo; pre-mixed baby

formula; and non-perishable food items not requiring water for preparation.

- Catholic Charities West Virginia Northern Region also collected items Friday at the Catholic Charities Center, and now is gathering financial donations to support the long-term relief efforts. Those interested in making a donation should call Catholic Charities at 304-905-9860, or visit its website at www.CatholicCharitiesWV.org.

The company where the leak occurred, Freedom Industries, discovered Thursday morning around 10:30 a.m. that the chemical was leaking from the bottom of a storage tank, said its president Gary Southern. Southern said the company worked all day and through the night to remove the chemical from the site and take it elsewhere. Vacuum trucks were used to remove the chemical from the ground at the site.

"We have the mitigated the risk, we believe, in terms of further material leaving this facility," he said.

Southern said he didn't think the chemical posed a public danger. He also said the company didn't know how much leaked.

State officials started investigating Thursday when people complained about an odor coming from near the company's river terminal. Inspectors found a leaking above-ground tank at the site just after 11 a.m. and realized that no one was trying to contain the spill, according to officials at the Department of Environmental Protection. The chemical was seeping through a containment dike, a backup intended to catch spills.

The spill brought West Virginia's most populous city and nearby areas to a virtual standstill, closing schools and offices and even forcing the Legislature to cancel its business for the day. Officials focused on getting water to people who needed it, particularly the elderly and disabled.

"If you are low on bottled water, don't panic because help is on the way," Gov. Earl Ray Tomblin said at a press conference Friday afternoon. The governor said there was no shortage of bottled water, and that officials were working to get water to those who need it.

The Federal Emergency Management Agency also planned to deliver more than a million liters of water from nearby Maryland. Several companies were sending bottled water and other supplies, including Pepsi and the Coca-Cola Co., Tomblin said.

However, it appeared that some level of panic already had set in to some degree. At the Kroger grocery store in the shadow of a DuPont plant along the Kanawha River, people scrambled in the aisles to find bottled water, only to learn the store had been out since early Friday.

Freedom Industries was ordered to stop storing chemicals in areas where they could flow into the containment dike that failed in Thursday's leak, said state Department of Environmental Protection spokesman Tom Aluise.

The tank that leaked holds at least 40,000 gallons, Aluise said, though officials believe no more than 5,000 gallons leaked from the tank. Some of that was contained before escaping into the river, he said.

The company was already cited for causing air pollution stemming from the odor first reported Thursday, Aluise said.

The primary component in the foaming agent that leaked is the chemical 4-methylcyclohexane methanol. The agent is mixed with ground-up coal to separate it from soil and rock particles, said Paul Ziemkiewicz, director of the West Virginia Water Research Institute.

The chemical is water-soluble, meaning it cannot be removed with surface booms that are sometimes effective in capturing spilled oil. The chemical evaporates easily, which explains the smell that many people reported, said Capt. Larry Cseh, environmental health scientist with the U.S. Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry.

The West Virginia National Guard has been running hourly tests on the chemical's concentration since Thursday night. A safe level is 1 part per million. The level has dropped from 2 to 1.7 parts per million, said Maj. Gen. James A. Hoyer, Adjutant General of West Virginia.

 
 

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